#regenuary

Choose positive impact.

Regenuary is simple. For one year source as much of your food as possible from regenerative farming.

What is Regenuary?

As consumers, we should be making better-informed choices about the food we buy and the effect it has on the environment. That’s why, for 2022, we’re encouraging you to consider the impact of everything you eat, and to source as much of your food as possible from producers who use regenerative farming methods.


We want to change the conversation around food and the environment. Throughout the year and beyond, we’re also encouraging you to engage in open and constructive discussions around food production, whether you follow an omnivorous, pescatarian, vegetarian or vegan diet.

How To Take Part

Join The Movement

Getting involved in Regenuary is as simple as following the steps below.

● Source as much of your food as possible from regenerative producers, from meat and fish to dairy, grains, nuts, seeds, legumes and vegetables

● Buy from British suppliers and do what you can to minimise the impact of transportation

● Where regenerative produce isn’t an option, look for produce marked as organic and biodynamic

● Buy direct from small producers wherever possible, including at farm shops and farmers markets

● Ask questions, do research, get involved in discussions and share your own ideas on food and the environment

● Share your experiences on social media using the hashtag #Regenuary

Understanding Regenerative Agriculture

What is Regenerative Agriculture?

Put simply, regenerative agriculture is a term that describes farming principles and practices that can reverse the damage done to the environment by the industrial food system. The principles of regenerative agriculture take in everything from soil health and the carbon cycleto biodiversity, land management, animal welfare and more, and draw from decades of scientific and applied research by the global communities of organic farming, agroecology, holistic management and agroforestry.

How can regenerative agriculture help the environment?

Food-producing farms that practice regenerative principles can help reduce the effects of humans on the environment by rebuilding soil and improving soil health, restoring biodiversity, improving the water cycle and enhancing local ecosystems through added complexity and greater natural resilience.

How can regenerative agriculture help reduce carbon emissions?

A monocultural, industrial farming of any type system steadily reduces soil health, resulting in a cycle of increasing reliance on artificial fertilisers that are often derived from fossil fuels. Healthy soil that’s supported naturally by grazing animals, however, actually has a positive effect. From meat and dairy farms to those producing vegetables and grains, the processes involved in regenerative agriculture can help capture huge amounts of carbon and above-ground biomass, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and reversing current global trends of atmospheric accumulation.

How can regenerative agriculture help farmers?

Any food that’s produced cheaply has a cost higher up the food chain, but regenerative agriculture offers benefits to farmers including increased yields, resilience to climate instability, and higher health and vitality for farmers, and helps reverse the negative effects of the industrial food system on farming communities.

How can regenerative agriculture improve animal welfare?

Within a regenerative system animals are eating a species appropriate diet and are encouraged to interact with the environment in a way that is natural to them. This means for example pigs will be rooting and turning over soil, poultry will be scratching at the land and cattle selectively grazing in a natural environment that enriches their experience compared to industrial farming.

Who can take part in Regenuary?

Regenuary is an inclusive campaign meant for consumers across a range of diets. While Regenuary aims to clarify misleading conceptions around meat production and its effect on the environment, you can still take part as a pescatarian, vegetarian or vegan using the same principles of buying from regenerative producers and getting involved in discussions around food and agriculture.

How did Regenuary start?

Regenuary began as a response to Veganuary in 2019. Our co-founder Glen Burrows, who was a vegetarian for 25 years before starting The Ethical Butcher, was frustrated with misleading messaging around veganism and its effect on the environment, and its co-opting by supermarkets and multinational corporations. He began Regenuary as a campaign on social media, whose impressions quickly grew into the millions. Today, Regenuary is a campaign that sees participation from millions of consumers and industry advocates.

Advocates

Our Regenuary advocates are people in and around the food and farming industries who are as passionate about changing the conversation and improving the food system as we are. They range from farmers and food producers to academics and writers. Read a little more about them below.

John Cherry

Regenerative Farmer

Weston Park Farms

Joanna Blythman

Writer

Guild of Food Writers Food Writer of the Year 2018

James Guernsey

Owner

Packington Estate

Helen Browning OBE

Chief Executive of the Soil Association

Tim Mead

Owner

Yeo Valley

Laura Jackson

Broadcaster / Businesswoman

Glassette / Hoste London

Adam Gray

Chef

London

Lana Joe Salant

Founder

EOM-Ethical Omnivore Movement

Tracy Worcester

Director

Farms Not Factories

Douglas McMaster

Owner / Head Chef

Silo London

Tom Parker Bowles

Writer & Food critic

Dominie Fearn

Founding Director

The Wild Hare Group

Jane Oglesby

Regenerative farmer

Janes Farm

Jack Mayhew

Co-Founder

Ember Snacks

Lucie and Jules

Owners

Ham Street Wines

Seth Itzkan

Director

Soil 4 Climate

Dave Kemp

Founder / CEO

Ethically Raised

Tim Rees

Author / Nutritionist

https://tim-rees.com/

Will

Co Founder

Two Fields Zakros

Abi Aspen Glencross

Head of Grains

Duchess Grains

Polly Bladwin

Owner

Jolly Trolley Regenerative Food Truck

Simon Herring

Regenerative Farmer

Founder Pipers Crisps

Clare Finney

Food Writer / Journalist

Johnny Wake

Regenerative Farmer

Courteenhall

Corrina Pyke

Marketing & Partnerships

Sustainable Wine Solutions

Regenerative Produce - What to look for

Our guide to low impact and regenerative produce. In this section, we consider what it means to be low or positive impact. Click through on each product category for a directory of brands working towards this.

Meats

Grazing animals are 100% pasture fed and are ruminants treated as part of an ecosystem. Poultry and pork are fed a natural diet and have a benefit to soil ecology. No soy is used in the animal feed and each farmer strives to improve and increase biodiversity on their land. Through careful regenerative methods, new soil is formed and carbon is sequestered.

Seafood and fish

Farmed or fresh seafood and Minimal foreign or introduced external inputs in the form of feed, fertilisers, antibiotics, etc. Production methods to minimise deleterious outputs and waste products, without inhibiting the ability of cohabitating wildlife to thrive. These suppliers contribute to the environment positively through habitat creation and/or water filtration.

Dairy produce

Cow, goat and sheep milks, cheeses, butters and yoghurts from grazing animals that are 100% pasture fed. They are ruminants treated as part of an ecosystem and no soy is used in the animal feed. Each farmer strives to improve and increase biodiversity on their land and new soil is formed while carbon is sequestered.

Grains, seeds and pulses

Regeneratively produced crops are grown and harvested minimising soil disturbance and the use of chemical inputs. Aiming to maximise biodiversity, both of animals and plants, the farmers keep the soil covered with crops for as long as possible. They are adapting to the local environment instead of trying to change nature.

Vegetables and fruits

The farmers employ methods to stimulate plant growth while increasing soil carbon deposits and fertility. In turn, insect and plant biodiversity is increased and so is soil carbon sequestration via well-managed practices. Minimum to zero tilling as well as the use of cover crops, crop rotations, compost, and animal manures, restoring the plant/soil microbiome.

Oils and fats

Regeneratively produced crops, minimising soil disturbance and the minimal to no use of chemical inputs. By keeping the soil covered with crops as long as possible and introducing animals to the system to control weeds and pests, farmers are maximising biodiversity, both in animals and plants. They are using companion crops and planting to restore soil health and carbon.

Meats

Grazing animals are 100% pasture fed and are ruminants treated as part of an ecosystem. Poultry and pork are fed a natural diet and have a benefit to soil ecology. No soy is used in the animal feed and each farmer strives to improve and increase biodiversity on their land. Through careful regenerative methods, new soil is formed and carbon is sequestered.

Seafood and fish

Farmed or fresh seafood and Minimal foreign or introduced external inputs in the form of feed, fertilisers, antibiotics, etc. Production methods to minimise deleterious outputs and waste products, without inhibiting the ability of cohabitating wildlife to thrive. These suppliers contribute to the environment positively through habitat creation and/or water filtration.

Dairy produce

Cow, goat and sheep milks, cheeses, butters and yoghurts from grazing animals that are 100% pasture fed. They are ruminants treated as part of an ecosystem and no soy is used in the animal feed. Each farmer strives to improve and increase biodiversity on their land and new soil is formed while carbon is sequestered.

Grains, seeds and pulses

Regeneratively produced crops are grown and harvested minimising soil disturbance and the use of chemical inputs. Aiming to maximise biodiversity, both of animals and plants, the farmers keep the soil covered with crops for as long as possible. They are adapting to the local environment instead of trying to change nature.

Vegetables and fruits

The farmers employ methods to stimulate plant growth while increasing soil carbon deposits and fertility. In turn, insect and plant biodiversity is increased and so is soil carbon sequestration via well-managed practices. Minimum to zero tilling as well as the use of cover crops, crop rotations, compost, and animal manures, restoring the plant/soil microbiome.

Oils and fats

Regeneratively produced crops, minimising soil disturbance and the minimal to no use of chemical inputs. By keeping the soil covered with crops as long as possible and introducing animals to the system to control weeds and pests, farmers are maximising biodiversity, both in animals and plants. They are using companion crops and planting to restore soil health and carbon.

Learn More

Blog Posts

Environment Nature

Veganuary and Regenuary 2022

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Environment Nature

What is #Regenuary 2022?

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Cow recipes

#Regenuary and the Jera Rune

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