#REGENUARY

What is it?

#REGENUARY

Where it started

The idea

In theory, someone could participate in veganuary eating any kind of processed and imported foods and to the inexperienced vegan shopper this is what is likely to happen, the meat will likely be replaced with fake meat substitutes.

The problem is that many fake meat substitutes are produced from highly processed plant based products grown as environmentally damaging mono crops and more often than not imported into the UK from other parts of the world, we consider this to have worse impact than the UK sourced meats they are replacing. This especially true is the meat comes from regenerative agriculture such as we source, then this trade off truly does more harm than good.

Thinking about what could happen if instead of encouraging people to avoid animal products at all costs they were persuaded to source their food from regenerative agriculture as much as possible, be it animal or arable, we coined the idea of #REGENUARY

The start

On 3rd January 2020 we posted a picture on facebook with the word Veganuary crossed out and replaced with the word Regenuary and wrote a couple of paragraphs about our thoughts on this, it was a simple idea, just another post challenging people to think, we didn't think too much about it.

By the end of the month the post had over a million impressions, had been shared nearly 6000 times with as many comments which were as polarised and divers as they were numerous.

The comments on the post ranged hugely from an outpouring of support to a large number of vegans who thought we were attacking their belief system.

The point was not to drive a divide between those who have removed animal products from their diet and those who consume them but simply to create an awareness that is possible to consume either diet in a low or a high impact way. 

Regenerative Produce - What to look for

Meats

Grazing animals are 100% pasture fed.

Ruminants treated as part of an ecosystem

Poultry and pork are fed a natural diet and have a benefit to soil ecology

No soy is used in animal feed

Farmers strive to improve and increase biodiversity on their land

New soil is formed and carbon is sequestered

The Ethical Butcher

Seafood and fish

Farmed or fresh seafood and fish (and seaweed) suppliers. 

Uses no foreign or introduced external inputs in the form of feed, fertilizers, antibiotics, etc.

Minimizes deleterious outputs and waste products.

Does not inhibit the ability of cohabitating wildlife to thrive in a natural way.

Contributes to the environment positively through habitat creation and/or water filtration.

Dairy Produce

Cow, goat and sheep milks, cheeses, butters and yoghurts.

Grazing animals are 100% pasture fed.

Ruminants treated as part of an ecosystem

No soy is used in animal feed

Farmers strive to improve and increase biodiversity on their land

New soil is formed and carbon is sequestered

Grains, seeds and pulses

Regernatively produced crops

Minimising soil disturbance.

Minimising the use of chemical inputs.

Maximising biodiversity, both animals and plants.

Keeping the soil covered with crops as long as possible.

Adapting to the local environment.

Vegetables and fruits

Minimum to zero tilling

The use of cover crops, crop rotations, compost, and animal manures, which restore the plant/soil microbiome

Building biological ecosystem diversity and restoring soil system energy via “inoculation of soils with composts or compost extracts” and “full-time planting of multiple crop intercrop plantings, multispecies cover crops, and borders planted for bee habitat and other beneficial insects

Stimulate plant growth, while also increasing soil carbon deposits and fertility, insect and plant biodiversity, and soil carbon sequestration via well-managed grazing practices.

Oils and fats

Regernatively produced crops

Minimising soil disturbance.

Minimising the use of chemical inputs.

Maximising biodiversity, both animals and plants.

Keeping the soil covered with crops as long as possible.

Introducing animals to the system to control weeds and pests

Using companion crops and planting to restore soil health and carbon.